Xakanaxa Camp


What a better way to experience 2 distinct and comparatively different areas of Makgadikgadi Salt Pans and Okavango Delta:

Camp Kalahari which is adjacent to Makgadikgadi National Park, is the best way to experience Makgadikgadi and Kalahari and is home to annual zebra and wildebeest migration. 

Xakanaxa Camp located in Moremi which is rated as one of Africa’s finest game-viewing areas, offering sanctuary to abundant herds of elephant, sable, giraffe, tsessebe, lechwe, wildebeest, impala and waterbuck. Lion, leopard, cheetah, wild dog and hyena complete the picture. 

 

THE SERENE MOONSCAPE OF THE MAKGADIKGADI SALT PANS

THE PRISTINE WATERWAYS OF THE OKAVANGO DELTA

4 NIGHT / 5 DAYS PACKAGE RATE:

FROM ONLY USD 2 105.00 PER PERSON SHARING!

Camp Kalahari        Xakanaxa Camp

Rates Include: Four nights Accommodation (two nights at each camp), all meals, activities, drinks (except premium brands), park fees, charter flights (seat in plane basis, min. 2 passengers) Maun / CK / Xak / Maun or v.v.

(Laundry & emergency evacuation insurance at Xakanaxa.)

 Rates Exclude: International flights, personal  travel insurance, visas, gratuities.

(Laundry and evacuation insurance at Camp Kalahari.)

Terms & Conditions apply!

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Rhino Sightings In Xakanaxa, Moremi Game Reserve

For four days around 16th August this year, Rhino tracks were found along the road at Jessie’s Pools near Xakanaxa Camp! Guests staying at Xakanaxa Camp said they had seen it as they flew into the camp the day before. This comes as very exciting news and shows that the Rhino release efforts are bearing fruit and the animals are spreading around the Okavango Delta area.

In 2001 the first four white Rhino were released into the Moremi Game Reserve with funding from Tusk Trust. A further 22 Rhino arrived as a result of a swap between South Africa and Botswana called ‘rhino-for-roan’. Unfortunately in 2003 the project suffered a setback when two rhino were killed by poachers. Within a week security was upgraded, the poachers were caught and three new rhino were released. Since then more than 23 calves were born in the reserve since 2001 and there have been no further losses. The Department of Wildlife and National Parks’ Anti-Poaching Unit has been providing security and monitoring the rhino on a daily basis, as well as recording GPS positions through a radio transmitter which is implanted in the horn of the animal.

Currently the focus of the project is to bring in more black rhino in order to form a healthy founder population in the Okavango Delta. The team hopes that the rhino will begin reproducing and expanding their range into parts of Botswana where they have not been seen in many years!

Rhino distribution is largely influenced by the availability of water, food and vegetational cover. During the rainy season they are often in areas which are difficult to reach, due to flooding. With more rhino sightings, game viewing should be very exciting in Xakanaxa!!

Xakanaxa Camp has special rates for SADC residents which are available upon request.